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Dog Days

The Dog Track was a burrito stand feeding starving artists and produce workers 24/7 at the corner of Olympic and Central.

The Dog Track was a burrito stand feeding starving artists and produce workers 24/7 at the corner of Olympic and Central. (Photo by Stephen Seemayer)

First in a series of nostalgic remembrances of places past in Downtown Los Angeles

Bob & Bob's artistic interpretation of dinner at the Dog Track.

Bob & Bob’s artistic interpretation of dinner at the Dog Track.

At the northeast corner of Olympic and Central, there once stood the greasiest of greasy spoons, the Dog Track, a burrito stand with a neon sign that at one time showed lighted Greyhounds chasing a rabbit around the circular base of its rooftop sign.

Open 24/7, the Dog Track’s main clientele were the workers who loaded produce on and off trucks at the neighboring Wholesale Produce Market.

Stephen Seemayer at his studio on Central Avenue. (Photo by Pamela Wilson)

Stephen Seemayer at his studio on Central Avenue. (Photo by Pamela Wilson)

But the artists who lived downtown, especially “Young Turks” director Stephen Seemayer — whose studio was directly across the street — knew that the Dog Track was the best place for a carnitas burrito at 3:30 in the morning. (It’s not that the food was the greatest, but the place was open — quite a selling point in the downtown of 1980.)

Seemayer’s 851 S. Central studio was condemned after the 1987 Whittier Narrows earthquake. But the Dog Track had already been lost in the expansion of the Produce Market in 1984.

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